Spiral Model (Boehm)

Barry Boehm has written an excellent article about the waterfall model, which was presented to the world in the form of his new book “The Waterfall Model.” [Sources: 0]

 

BarryA Boehm (Boehem, 1988) proposed a risk-driven software process framework that integrates spiral model, risk management and incremental development. Based on the unique risk patterns of a particular project, the team will guide the project to adopt the appropriate process model and risk profile for that project. In a later publication, he described it as a “process model generator” in which decisions based on project risk generate the “appropriate” process models for the project. Based on the unique risk pattern of each project, they guide teams to choose the right process with the right risk profiles for each project. [Sources: 3, 4, 9, 12]

 

For example, the spiral model is built at the beginning of each phase with a prototype process prototyping model. Then evaluations will be carried out to monitor the progress of the project and the system will be made available. [Sources: 1, 2, 5]

 

The aim of the spiral model for software processes is to create a framework for designing such processes, which is oriented to the risk potential of each individual project. Compared to the waterfall model, it offers the possibility to institutionalize the use of risk management, risk analysis and risk models. It also helps to develop the model for the software development process required for a software development project based on different risk patterns, thus ensuring an effective development process. [Sources: 1, 6, 10]

 

Based on the unique risk patterns of a particular project, the spiral model can guide the team to choose the most appropriate risk management approach for each individual project in the software development process. Depending on each unique risk pattern associated with the project, it can also serve as a framework for adopting best practices for using risk analysis and risk models for software projects. Based on the unique risk materials of a particular project, it can lead a team to develop a more efficient and effective risk management strategy for a particular software project. Based on a unique risk pattern for each project, the spiral model can also guide a team to adopt a better and more effective risk approach – the management approach for a particular software program. [Sources: 7, 11]

 

Although the spiral model is divided into phases of planning, risk assessment and simulation, it uses essentially the same phases. Based on the unique risk patterns of a particular project, the spiral model can guide the team to choose a better and more effective risk approach for a particular software project. The spiral models can also guide a team in choosing the most appropriate risk management strategy for each individual project in the software development process. Rather than simply being based on a unique risk pattern for a particular project, a spiral model can also be used by teams to take a more efficient and better management approach to the risk materials of each software program. A Spiral Model for Software Development, “spiral models are based on the unique risk materials of each project. [Sources: 0, 11, 13]

 

Therefore, incremental prototyping and other process models are more likely than spiral models to adapt to the risk patterns of a particular project, and there is a greater likelihood that the spiral model will fit them. Spiral models can be classified as risk-driven software development models, but they are just as effective as any other risk management approach. There are therefore greater opportunities than incremental prototypes or other process models of the spiral model that match the risk pattern of certain projects, as well as better and more efficient management approaches. [Sources: 1, 7, 11]

 

In an earlier paper, I used the term “process model” to refer to a spiral model of a software development project, as described by Barry Boehm. This model is described in detail in his book “The Spiral Model of Software Development” (1997). [Sources: 1, 3]

 

Boehm describes the spiral model as a process model generator, in which the selection is based on the project risk in order to generate a suitable “process model” for the project. Incremental prototyping and other process models therefore fit the risk pattern of a particular project rather than the spiral model. Incremental prototypes and others in the process model are therefore less likely than those in spiral models that match the risk patterns of certain projects. Therefore, in addition to the incremental prototype model, Boehm also describes a spiral model in the sense of the “spark model,” in which the selection of projects and risks is based on their risk in order to generate the appropriate process – model for each project and not on a single risk. [Sources: 11, 13]

 

Both the spiral model and the domain model are tailored to the process driver of a particular project in order to generate a specific process model for this project. In this tutorial we will look at everything that is known about the model, but the main goal is to show how both domain models and spiral models could be used to support a process – model generator. [Sources: 1, 8]

 

Sources:

 

[0]: https://www.seowebsitedesign.com/the-spiral-model-of-software-development/

 

[1]: https://www.h2kinfosys.com/blog/spiral-model/

 

[2]: https://binaryterms.com/spiral-model.html

 

[3]: http://www.owlapps.net/owlapps_apps/articles?id=149504&lang=en

 

[4]: http://technoindiahooghly.org/spark/index.php/technical/technology-talk/8-a-spiral-model-of-softwar-development-and-enhancement

 

[5]: https://www.thomasalspaugh.org/pub/fnd/softwareProcess.html

 

[6]: https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/computer-science/spiral-model

 

[7]: https://systechlogic.com/blog/spiral-model-advantages-and-disadvantages/

 

[8]: http://mason.gmu.edu/~kersch/KBSE_folder/ESPM_folder/ESPM_DM.html

 

[9]: https://iansommerville.com/software-engineering-book/static/web/spiral-model/

 

[10]: https://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2015/04/when-change-is-constant-a-spiral-ux-design-model.php

 

[11]: https://wiki2.org/en/Spiral_model

 

[12]: https://ware.zintegra.com/2014/06/06/spiral-and-agile/

 

[13]: https://medium.com/datadriveninvestor/spiral-project-management-methodology-in-healthcare-4d1d1aae8398